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Nutts Corner air crash dead largely forgotten

I often pass through Nutts Corner now the site of a Sunday market (I visited it but once on a December day many years ago and I think it is the coldest place in this country.)  Other activities such as the Irish Superbike Championships and rally cross were held there but abandoned  due to noise […]

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Immortalised in poetry but not by the poets

Few of us associate Glengormley with poetry. Seamus Heaney used one word to describe the place: bleak. Padraic Fiacc lived in Glengormley

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Big man of GAA celebrates in style

Veni, Vidi, Vinci . I came, I saw, I conquered, was the powerful message sent back to Rome by Julius Caesar when he won a war in Zela (currently known as Zile in Turkey. After spending two days with the Gaels of Glengormley, Mícheál Ó Muircheartaigh might well have sent a similar message back to headquarters. Throughout the two days he won the hearts of all who met him as he demonstrated his love and passion for the Irish language and Gaelic games.

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No Argie Bargy with the master of the whistle

It doesn’t matter which sport is being played the quality of the game depends as much on the ability of the referee as the level of performance of the players. Having done a stint with the whistle myself I tend to observe the referee as much as the players while watching football games, soccer or Gaelic.

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Top level secrecy used to bring maestro to world stage

There’s so much soccer on TV these days that it’s hard to keep track of the games. It is great to able to watch your favourite team at home or in the pub but for me it comes nowhere near to attending games live. When the subject is aired – who’s the best footballer you ever saw? – I restrict myself to players I have had the pleasure of observing in the flesh.

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A heady brew of Belfast’s spiritual history

In the late nineteenth century Belfast was hailed as a great industrial city. The shipyards of Workman, Clerk & Co and Harland & Wolff were major employers.

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